Eric Johnson

“Explicit and Implicit Strategies in Decision Making”

Coauthor(s): Christian Keysers, Robert Boyd, Jonathan Cohen, Merlin Donald, Werner Güth, Robert Kurzban, Lael J. Schooler, Jonathan Schooler, Elizabeth Spelke, Julia Trommershäuser.

Editors: Christoph Engel and Wolf Singer

Download:

Adobe Acrobat PDF

Abstract:

Human decision making may be best understood as a triad. At the level of a single human individual, decision making depends on a variety of processes: some are more explicit whereas others have a more implicit nature. These two types of processes produce and are, in turn, influenced by, among other things, human culture.

As the scope of our discussion group was to examine human decision making, we begin with a discussion on the uniqueness of human cognition. Thereafter we explore the nature of explicit and implicit processes, and how they interact, and conclude by incorporating culture into decision making.

Source: Better Than Conscious? Decision Making, the Human Mind, and Implications for Institutions
Exact Citation:
Johnson, Eric, Christian Keysers, Robert Boyd, Jonathan Cohen, Merlin Donald, Werner Güth, Robert Kurzban, Lael J. Schooler, Jonathan Schooler, Elizabeth Spelke, and Julia Trommershäuser. "Explicit and Implicit Strategies in Decision Making." In Better Than Conscious? Decision Making, the Human Mind, and Implications for Institutions, 225-258. Ed. Christoph Engel and Wolf Singer. MA: Massachusetts Institute for Technology and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 2008.
Pages: 225-258
Place: MA
Date: 5 2008