Elke Weber

“Perception of risk posed by extreme events”

Coauthor(s): Paul Slovic.

Editors: J. S. Applegate, J. G. Laitos, J. M. Gaba, and N. M. Sachs

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Abstract:
Extreme events, by definition, cause much harm to people, property, and the natural world. Such events can result from the vagaries of nature (floods or earthquakes) or from technological failure or unintentional human error (Chernobyl or Bhopal). More recently we have witnessed another form of extreme hazard, resulting from terrorism. This paper examines the complex interplay between emotion and reason that drives risk perceptions for extreme events and discusses the need to think creatively about what this means for the management of such risks.

Source: Regulation of Toxic Substances and Hazardous Waste
Exact Citation:
Slovic, Paul, and Elke Weber. "Perception of risk posed by extreme events." In Regulation of Toxic Substances and Hazardous Waste (2nd edition). Ed. J. S. Applegate, J. G. Laitos, J. M. Gaba, and N. M. Sachs. New York, NY: Foundation Press, November 2010.
Place: New York, NY
Date: 11 2010