Hugh Patrick

“Japan and the International Monetary Regime”

Editors: Takashi Inoguchi and Daniel I. Okimoto

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Abstract:
The international monetary regime, the set of rules that governs the monetary mechanism of international trade and investment, is one of the foundations of the world economy. The development of every national economy is conditioned by the way the international monetary regime is arranged, and every major economy has contributed, though with different degrees of importance, to its evolution. The Japanese economy is no exception. This paper reviews the postwar development of the international monetary regime involving Japan and Japan's growing involvement, evaluates the efficacy and viability of the current flexible exchange rate regimes, and speculates upon the possibility of the future reform of the international monetary regime as viewed across the Pacific.

Source: The Political Economy of Japan: The Changing International Context
Exact Citation:
Patrick, Hugh and Koichi Hamada. "Japan and the International Monetary Regime." In The Political Economy of Japan: The Changing International Context, 108-137. Ed. Takashi Inoguchi and Daniel I. Okimoto. Stanford: Stanford University Press, August 1988.
Pages: 108-137
Place: Stanford
Date: 8 1988