Joel Brockner

Culture and Procedural Fairness: When the Effects of What You Do Depend Upon How You Do It

Coauthor(s): Ya-Ru Chen, Elizabeth Mannix, Kwok Leung, Daniel Skarlicki.

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Abstract:
This paper evaluates whether cultural differences in people's tendencies to view themselves as interdependent or independent moderate the interactive relationship between procedural fairness and outcome favorability. In three studies, participants indicate their reactions to an exchange with another party as a function of the other party's procedural fairness and the outcome favorability associated with the exchange. Converging evidence across studies shows that the interactive relationship between procedural fairness and outcome favorability was more pronounced among participants with more interdependent forms of self-construal.

Source: Administrative Science Quarterly
Exact Citation:
Brockner, Joel, Ya-Ru Chen, Elizabeth Mannix, Kwok Leung, and Daniel Skarlicki. "Culture and Procedural Fairness: When the Effects of What You Do Depend Upon How You Do It." Administrative Science Quarterly 45, no. 1 (March 2000): 138-59.
Volume: 45
Number: 1
Pages: 138-59
Date: 3 2000