Joel Brockner

The Psychology of Voice and Performance Capabilities in Masculine and Feminine Cultures and Contexts

Coauthor(s): Kees Van den Bos, Jordan Stein, Dirk Steiner, Nico Van Yperen, Daphne Dekker.

Abstract:
In this article, we examine the hypothesis that in masculine cultures or in other contexts that emphasize competitive achievement, those with higher performance capabilities will feel empowered to have input in decisions and, hence, will desire opportunities to voice their opinions about decisions to be made. In contrast, in more feminine cultures or in other contexts that value the importance of nurturing people with lower capability, those with lower capabilities will feel valued as important group members, will feel worthy of receiving voice and, hence, will appreciate voice opportunities. We provide evidence for these predictions in 2 studies, 1 conducted in the United States (a more masculine culture) and 1 in the Netherlands (a more feminine culture). Evidence also comes from experimental conditions in both studies, in which we made salient to participants countercultural norms and values, that is, nurturing the less capable in the United States and competitive achievement in the Netherlands. Implications for the psychology of voice and cross-cultural research are discussed.

Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Exact Citation:
Van den Bos, Kees, Joel Brockner, Jordan Stein, Dirk Steiner, Nico Van Yperen, and Daphne Dekker. "The Psychology of Voice and Performance Capabilities in Masculine and Feminine Cultures and Contexts." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 99, no. 4 (2010): 638-648.
Volume: 99
Number: 4
Pages: 638-648
Date: 2010