Paul Ingram

Social Networks and Subjective Well-Being: The Effect of Regulatory Fit

Coauthor(s): Xi Zou, E. Tory Higgins.

Abstract:
What type of social network is associated with greater well-being? We argue that the effects of social networks on well-being depend on individuals' self-regulatory orientation — a basic motivational factor. We propose that brokerage networks fit a promotion-focused orientation that is concerned with eagerly pursuing gains, whereas closure networks fit a prevention-focused orientation that is concerned with vigilantly maintaining non-losses. Therefore, brokerage networks have a positive effect on well-being among promotion-focused people, whereas closure networks have a positive effect on well-being among prevention-focused people. We find support for these hypotheses in an analysis of 379 managers who reported higher levels of well-being when their professional networks fit their regulatory orientations.

Source: Working paper
Exact Citation:
Zou, Xi, Paul Ingram, and E. Tory Higgins. "Social Networks and Subjective Well-Being: The Effect of Regulatory Fit." Working paper, Columbia Business School, December 2010.
Date: 12 2010