Michel Tuan Pham

Beyond the Obvious: Chronic Imagery Vividness and Decision Making

Coauthor(s): Tom Meyvis, Rongrong Zhou.

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Abstract:
The authors investigate two competing hypotheses about how chronic vividness of imagery interacts with the vividness and salience of information in decision making. Results from four studies, covering a variety of decision domains, indicate that chronic imagery vividness rarely amplifies the effects of vivid and salient information. Imagery vividness may, in fact, attenuate the effects of vivid and salient information. This is because, relative to nonvivid imagers, vivid imagers rely less on information that appears obvious and rely more on information that seems less obvious. This tendency is so robust that vividness of imagery may amplify the effects of vivid information only when this information is the only information available in the decision field. The findings seem to reflect vivid imagers' tendency to totally immerse themselves in a decision problem and scrutinize the available information creatively.

Source: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Exact Citation:
Pham, Michel Tuan, Tom Meyvis, and Rongrong Zhou. "Beyond the Obvious: Chronic Imagery Vividness and Decision Making." Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 84, no. 2 (March 2001): 226-53.
Volume: 84
Number: 2
Pages: 226-53
Date: 3 2001